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Ph. D. Cynthia Andrea Awruch
Researcher

 

My primary research interest is in the reproductive endocrinology and physiology and the use of biochemical markers as tools for wildlife conservation. My Honours and PhD projects were concerned with the sustainable management sharks and the flow on effects of shark conservation. My research experience commenced in 2001 with my Honours investigation on the reproductive biology of the angel shark, obtained in Patagonian waters (Argentina). In 2002, I undertook my PhD (CSIRO and University of Tasmania, Australia), specialising in the reproductive biology and endocrinology of wild sharks. In 2008, I started my first postdoctoral position at James Cook University, (Australia) focusing on investigating post release survival of wild sharks and rays, and the implication for management and conservation programs. My second postdoctoral position (2011-2013) was a National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) postdoctoral fellowship at the CENPAT (Patagonian National Centre), Puerto Madryn, Argentina. From July 2013 until July 2015, I have held a joint position at the University of Tasmania as Junior Researcher and as a Research Manager for the Faculty of Science. Since August 2015 I hold a Senior Fellow position at CESIMAR (Centre for the Study of Marine Systems)-CENPAT (Patagonia, Argentina) and an Associate Research position at the School of Biological Sciences (University of Tasmania). I focus my research career in the use of reproductive endocrinology and a physiology as a non-lethal tools to address topics on ecophysiology for the conservation and management of marine fish, sharks, rays and chimaeras.

Hormonas

ectotermos

Distribution

Ecología

Mamíferos

estrés

Evolución

peces

Cambio Climático

Cortisol

Patrones

Capacidad

aves

estresores

Causas

Ecoinmunología

peces

Hormonas

Fisiología

Distribución

Aves

Mamíferos

Ecología

Estresores

patrones